Now open - Online & 165 Nantasket Ave Hull
Now open - Online & 165 Nantasket Ave Hull
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SWEDISH CANDY

The DALA HORSE

The Dala Horse, in Swedish "Dalahäst", is from Dalarna in central Sweden. These hand-carved wooden toy horses originated in the 16th century, but became a famous example of Swedish folk art at the 1939 New York World's Fair. The Dala Horse is now a treasured symbol of Sweden with its distinctive hand-painted ornamentation on a carved red horse.

The FOREST TROLL

 In Swedish folklore, the troll is a mythological creature with a big nose and long hair. Many trolls live deep in Trollskogen, "Forest of Trolls" in English, known for its gnarled pines and old oak trees on the easternmost part of Swedish Öland. The thick forest is a perfect hiding spot for trolls - legend says they turn to stone when exposed to sunlight!

The VIKING AGES

Meet Sven, our Swedish Viking. Sven and his friends lived during the Viking Age of 800-1066 AD in Sweden, Denmark and Norway. Despite the folklore, Sven and most Scandinavians of his time were peaceful farmers who even skied for fun. However, several chieftain-led Scandinavian tribes were expert sailors and pirates, using their famous wooden longships to stage hit and run raids on foreign shores. Sagas tells about a Viking called Thorvald Eriksson visited Poit Allerton in Hull long before Christopher Columbus.

THE SWEDISH LÖRDAGSGODIS TRADITION

Every Saturday, Swedish children are allowed to eat as much candy as they want. This sweet tradition is known as "Lördagsgodis" or "Saturday's candies." Swedes enjoy all types of candy on this day, especially tart, sugary goodness like the Sour Skull. Of course, the tradition is not only for children. Adults join in too because - who wouldn't want to indulge in delicious candy every Saturday?